How not to be ignorant about the world

In this TED Talk Hans Rosling presents the results of our public surveys that shows that people don’t know key aspects of global development. And Ola Rosling shows that this has nothing to do with intelligence. It’s a problem of factual knowledge. Facts don’t come naturally. Drama and opinions do. Factual knowledge has to be learned. So Ola teachers 4 rules of thumb for not being ignorant about the world.

Minorities and global health

Helena Nordenstedt presents the Global Health Framework, which can help you to understand how income is related to health. Basically, low income countries tend to have a lower life expectancy than countries in higher income levels.

She shows that minority groups within countries (in all income levels) generally have a lower life expectancy than the rest of the population, but as the countries get richer and healthier, the health of the minorities also improve.

She also shows that there is no minority group in middle income and high income countries that has a life expectancy lower than the average in poor countries.

 

Everyone lives on Dollar Street

Imagine all people in the World lived along one long street. And imagine all houses were sorted by income. The poorest to the left. The richest to the right. What would it look like, and where would you live?

Back in 2003 Anna got obsessed with the idea of making such systematic photo documentation of all common items from homes all over the world, to see what everyday life looks like, with different incomes. Her project launched in 2016 with more than 300 homes from 52 different countries documented. Anna was then invited to present it at TED in Vancouver in April 2017, and now you can watch her talk here. (Or scroll down to see how you can contribute to this unique free image bank, by adding more homes from more countries).

 

Even if we have 300+ families documented, we want more. Dollar Street is a one of a kind image bank of everyday life across the world. It uses photos as data to show what life looks like on all different income levels. If you like to contribute with more homes, please contact [email protected]  (All images are free to use, under Creative Common License CC BY 4.0.).

Using photos as data to understand how people live

Dollar Street is the brainchild of Anna Rosling where she uses photos as data to make everyday life on different income all over the World easy to understand! It is a free website with 300+ homes from 52 countries ordered by income. Imagine all people in the World lived on the same street, the poorest to the left and the richest to the right. Where would you live?

Do you want better coverage in your country? Welcome to add your home to the street – you can find the resources here.

Population growth explained with IKEA boxes

About the video

Explaining population growth requires simplification, but not oversimplification.
In this TED video, Hans Rosling explains why ending poverty – over the coming decades – is crucial to stop population growth. Only by raising the living standards of the poorest, in an environmentally-friendly way, will population growth stop at 9 billion people in 2050.

Asia’s rise, how and when (TEDIndia)

About this talk

Hans Rosling, at the first TED-conference in India, predicts when China and India will catch up with the United States in terms of income per person. He graphs global economic growth since 1858, depicting some of the main events using images and animated Gapminder charts.

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TED and Reddit’s 10 questions

About the Interview

In a cooperation between the internet community Reddit and TED,Reddit users got to put their questions to Hans Rosling. In this video response he answers the top 10 questions with explaining graphs.

Join the discussions at Reddit.com »
The original TED-blog post »

The 10 questions:

1. What is your min is the number one lesson to be learned from your way of looking at data; what ought our governments do that they are not doing.
/numberwang

2. If you could present your stats to a panel of any five people in the world, who would you chosse and why?
/reubensandwich

3. In my experience, people do not understand statistics and will never change their opinion based on statistics, I would like to ask if you agree.
/universalsprout

4. What are the most startling or intriguing correlation you have encountered while playing with different values on the the x and y axis at gapminder.org.
/rugs729

5. What do you think of the state of statistics education in high school and colleges?
/kunjaan

6. Would you be willing to help the WhiteHouse present the Healthcare budget in such a way as to make it easier for the average person to understand the value of a public option or single payer plan?
/gerskerski

7. Do you think CUDA is an important step in the path of better and richer visualizations of data?
/playeren

8. What are your future plans for Gapminder?
/papper

9. What can bra done to encourage governments and international organizations to more actively and effectively collect and publish vital statistics?
/bordergroves

10a. But how do you recommend that I or we help the “bottom billion”? I’m wondering about practical ways the “top billion” can assist the “bottom billion” with small units of organizations.
/Phatlikebuddha

10b. What’s it like knowing so many on reedit have intense nerd crushes on you?
/Stranger2love

Let my dataset change your mindset


About this talk:
In the talk at the US State Department in the summer of 2009, Hans  Rosling showed the overall global trends in health and income over the last 200 years, the development of the HIV/AIDS-epidemic and how China is catching up on the richest countries.

It was also the 500th TED-talk of all times.


From TED:s webpage:
Talking at the US State Department this summer, Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. Look for new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.


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TED:s webpage »

HIV: New facts and stunning data visuals

Update: Use the HIV presentation material in your own lecture – Download here.

In this talk at the TED conference in Feb. 2009, Hans Rosling explains the HIV epidemic.
He converts the best available data from UNAIDS and WHO into understandable Gapminder bubbles.

The two key messages are that the global HIV epidemic has reached a “steady state” with 1% of the adult world population infected and that there are huge differences in HIV occurrence between and within African countries. Many African countries have the same, relatively low, HIV levels as can be found in most of the world, whereas 50% of the world’s HIV infected persons live in a few countries in Eastern and Southern Africa (with 4% of the world population).

Hans Rosling closes his speech by summarizing probable reasons for the high HIV burden in parts of Eastern and Southern Africa and he also claims that the focus must be on preventing further HIV transmission in these highly affected populations.

Hans also did mention that male circumcision has been proven to reduce the transmission of HIV, but unfortunately this statement had to be removed due to a confusing wording (on Hans’ request).

A caveat:

It’s challenging to summarize the present understanding of the very high HIV levels in a few countries, because there is no clear-cut consensus among researchers. The final remarks (last 2 minutes of the video) will therefore be expanded in a later video lecture.


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HIV in Gapminder World

Gapminder HIV Chart 2009 (PDF)

Speeches from 2006 & 2007.

Debunking myths about the “third world”

About this talk

You’ve never seen data presented like this. Hans Rosling’s presentation at the TED-conference in 2006 has been seen by millions over the internet, at TED’s web-page, at Google Video or Youtube.

With the urgency of a sportscaster,  Hans Rosling debunks myths about the so-called “developing world” using the animation software that powers Gapminder World.

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Flash-presentation used.

The seemingly impossible is possible

About this talk

This year, 2007, Hans Rosling’s TED-speech focused on making the seemingly impossible possible.

The Trendalyzer software (recently acquired by Google) turns complex global trends into lively animations, making decades of data pop. Asian countries, as colorful bubbles, float across the grid – toward better national health and wealth.

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Go to the speach from 2006.