US health spending

The spending data comes from WHO[12]. The comparison between US spending and spending in other capitalist countries on Level 4 comes from OECD[1], a study named “Why Is Health Spending in the United States So High? ” It concludes that costs in the US health-care system are higher across the board, but in particular costs of outpatient care and administration; and that this does not lead to better outcomes, because the system is not incentivizing doctors to spend time with the patients most in need of care.

***

This page is under construction. We are working on it (and a lot of other pages too). If you need this particular page urgently, you can always drop us a line, and we might be able to squeeze it to the top of our prio list…

Contact us at [email protected]

Japanese: このページを含め、多くの出典ページは現在改稿中です。このページの情報がいますぐ知りたいという方は [email protected] までご連絡ください。

Updated Gapminder World Poster 2015!

Thanks to all Gapminders on Facebook for feedback on the previous version!

We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!

countries_health_wealth_2016_v15

Click here to download the PDF file. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in December 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

It’s clear in this chart that there is are not two groups of countries. There is no developing vs. developed, rich vs. poor. Instead of labeling countries in two groups, we suggest using the 4 income levels marked on the chart. Remember that next year the countries may change their positions, so let’s not label them, but mention the levels in which they find themselves now.

No country on level 4 has really short life expectancy, and no country on level 1 have long life expectancy. Most people live in the middle, on levels 2 and 3. There are huge differences in life expectancy in the middle, depending on how income is used.

 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

You can find a free interactive version of this chart at www.gapminder.org/tools, in which you can play historic time series & compare other indicators.

 

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

 

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

 

Gapminder World Poster 2015

Here is the new Gapminder World Poster showing the health and wealth of all countries in 2015!

UPDATE:
We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!
See the update here

 

countries_health_wealth_2016_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in September 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. Or put differently; in countries with longer lives, GDP per capita is higher. The connection between health and wealth doesn’t tell us which comes first. But one thing is clear: there are not two groups of countries, despite what many people think. Dividing the countries into two groups, developing vs. developed, is extremely misleading.

Labels make it easier to talk about groups of countries. But the labels should be relevant. So we recommend using the 4 income levels marked on the top of the chart. It’s better practice to divide the world into 4 groups and it’s better to label the levels and not the countries, because next year the members in each group will change.

Notice how none of the countries on level 4 have really short life expectancy. And none of the countries on level 1 have long life expectancies. Most people live in countries on level 2 and 3, where there are huge differences in life expectancy. For example Vietnam and Nigeria are both on level 2. Most people live in middle income levels 2 and 3 where there is a wide range in lifespans, depending on differences in how the income is used to save lives.

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

Gapminder World Poster 2013

This chart compares Life Expectancy & GDP per capita of 182 nations in the year 2013. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. No high income countries have really short life expectancy, and no low income countries have very long life expectancy. Still, there is a huge difference in life expectancy between countries on the same income level. Most people live in Middle Income countries where difference in lifespan is huge between countries; depending on how income is distributed and how it is used.

gapminder_world_2013_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. The chart was produced in November 2014 and revised in March 2015.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), Jan 14 2015, with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME 2014, available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/le/, Jan 14 2015.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision. 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at www.gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

Gapminder HIV Chart

About this Chart

Gapminder HIV Chart 2009 is a map for print. It may be redistributed under a CreativeCommons license.
The size of the country bubbles in the chart represents the Number of people living with HIV. The y-axis and x-axis shows Adult HIV prevalence rate and Income per person, respectively.
Read more about HIV Trends in the blog: “See new surprising trends in HIV”

See "Gaps" within each country

After several months of testing, a new service of Gapminder is now available. 

During the process of development, different geographical regions within the same country could have very different speed of development, and this may cause significant internal gaps. By using statistics animation technology, these gaps could be visualized and the change over time could also be displayed. For example, you could compare the development of Utah from US and Shanghai from China during the last 3 decades: Utah vs Shanghai

We would strongly recommended that you read the “PDF tutorial” and the “Caveat” to the left of the graph first.

Downloads

Gapminder Slides

Download Gapminder’s slides, free to modify and use in any way you like!

Here are the slides used in our public presentations and TED talks.

Download Gapminder slides

Gapminder Tools Offline

This software allows you to show animated statistics from your own laptop.

You can use it without internet access. Updates automatically when new data is available. Download

Gapminder Offline Screenshot

Factfulness Posters

Put this on your wall to keep reminding yourself of the Factfulness rules of thumb.

Handouts & Lesson plans (PDF)

Explore our handouts and lesson plans available for download here!

 

 

New Indicator: Public & private health expenditure (% of GDP)

On request we now add the new indicator “Public & private health expenditure (% of GDP)”.

It shows how big share of the average person’s income is being spent on health care, whether it is through the tax they pay, the health insurance they have or through out-of pocket expenses.

Here the indicator is compared with Infant Mortality in Gapminder World.

Here is a link to the spreadsheet of the indicator.

Unfortunatly the indicator only covers the years 2000-2004 (with three exceptions), so any tips on where we can find data covering more years are most welcomed.

Turkey meets France

httpvh://youtube.com/watch?v=j4GztlkyedQ

About this Gapminder Video

There are many differences between Turkey and France. But are the differences increasing or decreasing? From a public health perspective, the answer is obvious, Turkey is catching up.

Even if the population growth is still faster in Turkey than in France, the number of children per women today is almost the same, which means that the polulation growth in Turkey will slow down.

Maternal mortality

httpvh://youtube.com/watch?v=LilKcFUhuNw

About this Gapminder Video

How many women die every year during pregnancy and childbirth? Do we even know?

The most qualified guess tells us that about 500 000 women die every year because of pregnancy. However, the numbers are so uncertain, that we can’t even tell if the situation improves from one year to another.

So, if the uncertainty about the maternal mortality is so high, is there any point of measuring maternal mortality at all? And how can we tell if things are improving?

The answers are: Yes it is. And there are better ways of monitoring progress for pregnant women in the world.

While maternal mortality cannot be used to measure progress year by year towards safe motherhood, at least not in low income countries, we need to know the magnitude of the problem. Therefore we need to know roughly how many women dies every year while giving birth.

But in order to solve the problem, and to see if we are improving from one year to another, we should look at other indicators such as how many births that are attended by skilled health staff.

Har världen blivit bättre?

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Se utvecklingen under 1962-2003 för alla världens länder. Utvecklad i samarbete med Aktuellt – Sveriges Television (SVT).

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Flash-presentation

Has the World Become a Better Place?

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A presentation showing fertility rate and child mortality of all countries 1962-2003. Developed in collaboration with Aktuellt at the Swedish Public Service broadcaster – Sveriges Television (SVT) . Produced 2005.

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