Updated Gapminder World Poster 2015!

Thanks to all Gapminders on Facebook for feedback on the previous version!

We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!

countries_health_wealth_2016_v15

Click here to download the PDF file. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in December 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

It’s clear in this chart that there is are not two groups of countries. There is no developing vs. developed, rich vs. poor. Instead of labeling countries in two groups, we suggest using the 4 income levels marked on the chart. Remember that next year the countries may change their positions, so let’s not label them, but mention the levels in which they find themselves now.

No country on level 4 has really short life expectancy, and no country on level 1 have long life expectancy. Most people live in the middle, on levels 2 and 3. There are huge differences in life expectancy in the middle, depending on how income is used.

 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

You can find a free interactive version of this chart at www.gapminder.org/tools, in which you can play historic time series & compare other indicators.

 

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

 

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

 

Gapminder World Poster 2015

Here is the new Gapminder World Poster showing the health and wealth of all countries in 2015!

UPDATE:
We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!
See the update here

 

countries_health_wealth_2016_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in September 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. Or put differently; in countries with longer lives, GDP per capita is higher. The connection between health and wealth doesn’t tell us which comes first. But one thing is clear: there are not two groups of countries, despite what many people think. Dividing the countries into two groups, developing vs. developed, is extremely misleading.

Labels make it easier to talk about groups of countries. But the labels should be relevant. So we recommend using the 4 income levels marked on the top of the chart. It’s better practice to divide the world into 4 groups and it’s better to label the levels and not the countries, because next year the members in each group will change.

Notice how none of the countries on level 4 have really short life expectancy. And none of the countries on level 1 have long life expectancies. Most people live in countries on level 2 and 3, where there are huge differences in life expectancy. For example Vietnam and Nigeria are both on level 2. Most people live in middle income levels 2 and 3 where there is a wide range in lifespans, depending on differences in how the income is used to save lives.

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

Gapminder World Poster 2013

This chart compares Life Expectancy & GDP per capita of 182 nations in the year 2013. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. No high income countries have really short life expectancy, and no low income countries have very long life expectancy. Still, there is a huge difference in life expectancy between countries on the same income level. Most people live in Middle Income countries where difference in lifespan is huge between countries; depending on how income is distributed and how it is used.

gapminder_world_2013_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. The chart was produced in November 2014 and revised in March 2015.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), Jan 14 2015, with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME 2014, available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/le/, Jan 14 2015.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision. 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at www.gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

Asia’s rise, how and when (TEDIndia)

About this talk

Hans Rosling, at the first TED-conference in India, predicts when China and India will catch up with the United States in terms of income per person. He graphs global economic growth since 1858, depicting some of the main events using images and animated Gapminder charts.

Related content

TED and Reddit’s 10 questions

About the Interview

In a cooperation between the internet community Reddit and TED,Reddit users got to put their questions to Hans Rosling. In this video response he answers the top 10 questions with explaining graphs.

Join the discussions at Reddit.com »
The original TED-blog post »

The 10 questions:

1. What is your min is the number one lesson to be learned from your way of looking at data; what ought our governments do that they are not doing.
/numberwang

2. If you could present your stats to a panel of any five people in the world, who would you chosse and why?
/reubensandwich

3. In my experience, people do not understand statistics and will never change their opinion based on statistics, I would like to ask if you agree.
/universalsprout

4. What are the most startling or intriguing correlation you have encountered while playing with different values on the the x and y axis at gapminder.org.
/rugs729

5. What do you think of the state of statistics education in high school and colleges?
/kunjaan

6. Would you be willing to help the WhiteHouse present the Healthcare budget in such a way as to make it easier for the average person to understand the value of a public option or single payer plan?
/gerskerski

7. Do you think CUDA is an important step in the path of better and richer visualizations of data?
/playeren

8. What are your future plans for Gapminder?
/papper

9. What can bra done to encourage governments and international organizations to more actively and effectively collect and publish vital statistics?
/bordergroves

10a. But how do you recommend that I or we help the “bottom billion”? I’m wondering about practical ways the “top billion” can assist the “bottom billion” with small units of organizations.
/Phatlikebuddha

10b. What’s it like knowing so many on reedit have intense nerd crushes on you?
/Stranger2love

Swine flu alert! News/Death ratio: 8176


About this Video

During the last 13 days, up to May 6, WHO has confirmed that 25 countries are affected by the Swine flu and 31 persons have died from Swine flu. WHO data indicates that about 60 000 persons died from TB during the same period. By a rough comparison with the number of news reports found by Google news search, Hans Rosling calculates a News/Death ratio and issue an alert for a media hype on Swine flu and a neglect of tuberculosis.

WHO TB data available at http://apps.who.int/globalatlas/dataQuery/default.asp

WHO Swine Flu data available at http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/updates/en/index.html

200 years that changed the world

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About this Video

It was the last 200 years that changed the world. In 1809 all countries of the world had a life expectancy under 40 years and an income per person less than 3000 dollar per year. Since then the world has changed but it was not until after the second world war that most countries started to improve.

For the first time, Gapminder can now visualize change in life expectancy and income per person over the last two centuries. In this Gapminder video, Hans Rosling shows you how all the countries of the world have developed since 1809 – 200 years ago.

The interactive animations and corresponding documentation are freely available at www.gapminder.org/world.

Download

Download video in high resolution here.

Related content

200 year time series in Gapminder World
Teacher Guide: 200 years that changed the world

Gapminder HIV Chart

About this Chart

Gapminder HIV Chart 2009 is a map for print. It may be redistributed under a CreativeCommons license.
The size of the country bubbles in the chart represents the Number of people living with HIV. The y-axis and x-axis shows Adult HIV prevalence rate and Income per person, respectively.
Read more about HIV Trends in the blog: “See new surprising trends in HIV”

Human Development Trends, 2005

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About this Flash presentation

A presentation for UNDP Human Development Report 2005 in English and some other languages. Human Development Trends was produced in 2005.

Available in:

English, Danish, Finnish, French, German, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish.

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(open .zip-file and run “application.swf” in your Flash Player)

Source

The data used in the presentation above is based on estimates from the following background paper for the Human Development Report 2005:​

Dikhanov, Yuri (2005). Trends in global income distribution, 1970-2000, and scenarios for 2015. Human Development Report Office Occasional paper.

Income Distribution, 2003

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About this Flash presentation

Compare income distribution within or between countries. Based on data from Professor Xavier Sala-i-Martin.

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