Updated Gapminder World Poster 2015!

Thanks to all Gapminders on Facebook for feedback on the previous version!

We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!

countries_health_wealth_2016_v15

Click here to download the PDF file. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in December 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

It’s clear in this chart that there is are not two groups of countries. There is no developing vs. developed, rich vs. poor. Instead of labeling countries in two groups, we suggest using the 4 income levels marked on the chart. Remember that next year the countries may change their positions, so let’s not label them, but mention the levels in which they find themselves now.

No country on level 4 has really short life expectancy, and no country on level 1 have long life expectancy. Most people live in the middle, on levels 2 and 3. There are huge differences in life expectancy in the middle, depending on how income is used.

 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

You can find a free interactive version of this chart at www.gapminder.org/tools, in which you can play historic time series & compare other indicators.

 

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

 

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

 

Gapminder World Poster 2015

Here is the new Gapminder World Poster showing the health and wealth of all countries in 2015!

UPDATE:
We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!
See the update here

 

countries_health_wealth_2016_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in September 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. Or put differently; in countries with longer lives, GDP per capita is higher. The connection between health and wealth doesn’t tell us which comes first. But one thing is clear: there are not two groups of countries, despite what many people think. Dividing the countries into two groups, developing vs. developed, is extremely misleading.

Labels make it easier to talk about groups of countries. But the labels should be relevant. So we recommend using the 4 income levels marked on the top of the chart. It’s better practice to divide the world into 4 groups and it’s better to label the levels and not the countries, because next year the members in each group will change.

Notice how none of the countries on level 4 have really short life expectancy. And none of the countries on level 1 have long life expectancies. Most people live in countries on level 2 and 3, where there are huge differences in life expectancy. For example Vietnam and Nigeria are both on level 2. Most people live in middle income levels 2 and 3 where there is a wide range in lifespans, depending on differences in how the income is used to save lives.

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

Gapminder World Poster 2013

This chart compares Life Expectancy & GDP per capita of 182 nations in the year 2013. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. No high income countries have really short life expectancy, and no low income countries have very long life expectancy. Still, there is a huge difference in life expectancy between countries on the same income level. Most people live in Middle Income countries where difference in lifespan is huge between countries; depending on how income is distributed and how it is used.

gapminder_world_2013_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. The chart was produced in November 2014 and revised in March 2015.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), Jan 14 2015, with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME 2014, available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/le/, Jan 14 2015.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision. 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at www.gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

Asia’s rise, how and when (TEDIndia)

About this talk

Hans Rosling, at the first TED-conference in India, predicts when China and India will catch up with the United States in terms of income per person. He graphs global economic growth since 1858, depicting some of the main events using images and animated Gapminder charts.

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TED and Reddit’s 10 questions

About the Interview

In a cooperation between the internet community Reddit and TED,Reddit users got to put their questions to Hans Rosling. In this video response he answers the top 10 questions with explaining graphs.

Join the discussions at Reddit.com »
The original TED-blog post »

The 10 questions:

1. What is your min is the number one lesson to be learned from your way of looking at data; what ought our governments do that they are not doing.
/numberwang

2. If you could present your stats to a panel of any five people in the world, who would you chosse and why?
/reubensandwich

3. In my experience, people do not understand statistics and will never change their opinion based on statistics, I would like to ask if you agree.
/universalsprout

4. What are the most startling or intriguing correlation you have encountered while playing with different values on the the x and y axis at gapminder.org.
/rugs729

5. What do you think of the state of statistics education in high school and colleges?
/kunjaan

6. Would you be willing to help the WhiteHouse present the Healthcare budget in such a way as to make it easier for the average person to understand the value of a public option or single payer plan?
/gerskerski

7. Do you think CUDA is an important step in the path of better and richer visualizations of data?
/playeren

8. What are your future plans for Gapminder?
/papper

9. What can bra done to encourage governments and international organizations to more actively and effectively collect and publish vital statistics?
/bordergroves

10a. But how do you recommend that I or we help the “bottom billion”? I’m wondering about practical ways the “top billion” can assist the “bottom billion” with small units of organizations.
/Phatlikebuddha

10b. What’s it like knowing so many on reedit have intense nerd crushes on you?
/Stranger2love

Let my dataset change your mindset


About this talk:
In the talk at the US State Department in the summer of 2009, Hans  Rosling showed the overall global trends in health and income over the last 200 years, the development of the HIV/AIDS-epidemic and how China is catching up on the richest countries.

It was also the 500th TED-talk of all times.


From TED:s webpage:
Talking at the US State Department this summer, Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. Look for new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.


Download movie in high resolution

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Related Content

More speeches »
TED:s webpage »

Crisis narrows China-UK gap

About this Video

200 years ago, United Kingdom was a leading nation of the world – both in regard to health and economy. In this video, Hans Rosling details UK’s 200-year journey, to present time, and also shows that China, in the coming five years, will narrow the gap to UK faster than ever.

Related content

See UK and China in Gapminder World.

HIV: New facts and stunning data visuals

Update: Use the HIV presentation material in your own lecture – Download here.

In this talk at the TED conference in Feb. 2009, Hans Rosling explains the HIV epidemic.
He converts the best available data from UNAIDS and WHO into understandable Gapminder bubbles.

The two key messages are that the global HIV epidemic has reached a “steady state” with 1% of the adult world population infected and that there are huge differences in HIV occurrence between and within African countries. Many African countries have the same, relatively low, HIV levels as can be found in most of the world, whereas 50% of the world’s HIV infected persons live in a few countries in Eastern and Southern Africa (with 4% of the world population).

Hans Rosling closes his speech by summarizing probable reasons for the high HIV burden in parts of Eastern and Southern Africa and he also claims that the focus must be on preventing further HIV transmission in these highly affected populations.

Hans also did mention that male circumcision has been proven to reduce the transmission of HIV, but unfortunately this statement had to be removed due to a confusing wording (on Hans’ request).

A caveat:

It’s challenging to summarize the present understanding of the very high HIV levels in a few countries, because there is no clear-cut consensus among researchers. The final remarks (last 2 minutes of the video) will therefore be expanded in a later video lecture.


Download movie in high resolution

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Related Content

HIV in Gapminder World

Gapminder HIV Chart 2009 (PDF)

Speeches from 2006 & 2007.

Swine flu alert! News/Death ratio: 8176


About this Video

During the last 13 days, up to May 6, WHO has confirmed that 25 countries are affected by the Swine flu and 31 persons have died from Swine flu. WHO data indicates that about 60 000 persons died from TB during the same period. By a rough comparison with the number of news reports found by Google news search, Hans Rosling calculates a News/Death ratio and issue an alert for a media hype on Swine flu and a neglect of tuberculosis.

WHO TB data available at http://apps.who.int/globalatlas/dataQuery/default.asp

WHO Swine Flu data available at http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/updates/en/index.html

Human rights & democracy statistics

About this Video

In this video, made for the Oslo freedom Forum 2009, Hans Rosling discuss the difficulty in measuring progress in Human Rights in the form of comparable numerical statistics. He also shows the surprisingly weak correlation between existing estimates for democracy and socio-economic progress.

The reason may be that democracy and human rights measurements are badly done. It may also be that democracy and human rights are dimensions of development that are in themselves difficult to assign numerical values. But it also seems as much improvement in health, economy and education can be achieved with modest degrees of human rights and democracy. Hans Roslings concluding remark is that Human rights and Democracy maybe should be mainly regarded as values in themselves rather than means to achieve something else.


Related content

Democracy and GDP per capita in Gapminder World


Links:

http://oslofreedomforum.org
http://www.amnesty.org/en/human-rights/human-rights-by-country
http://filipspagnoli.wordpress.com/stats-on-human-rights/
http://www.systemicpeace.org/polity/polity4.htm

 

200 years that changed the world

Switch off (and on) subtitles by clicking the icon in the bottom right corner of the video player.

About this Video

It was the last 200 years that changed the world. In 1809 all countries of the world had a life expectancy under 40 years and an income per person less than 3000 dollar per year. Since then the world has changed but it was not until after the second world war that most countries started to improve.

For the first time, Gapminder can now visualize change in life expectancy and income per person over the last two centuries. In this Gapminder video, Hans Rosling shows you how all the countries of the world have developed since 1809 – 200 years ago.

The interactive animations and corresponding documentation are freely available at www.gapminder.org/world.

Download

Download video in high resolution here.

Related content

200 year time series in Gapminder World
Teacher Guide: 200 years that changed the world

Lung Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Lung cancer remains a deadly disease and most cases are caused by cigarette smoking.

Using data from IARC ( International Agency for research on Cancer) in Lyon, France, Hans Rosling shows the dramatic differences between men and women, between countries and between different decades in the same country. They are due to variations in tobacco smoking in the world. Most people in low income countries cannot afford many cigarettes, and hence have low risk for lung cancer. Middle income countries have the highest frequency of tobacco smoking, and hence of lung cancer. In most high income countries health education and regulations are having effects, tobacco consumption is reduced and so the risk of lung cancer in men. But unfortunately smoking and lung cancer is still increasing in women in many countries. Iceland is the first country to reach equal smoking frequencies in men and women and now also have the same risk for lung cancer in both sexes.

In spite of growing concerns for environmental toxins, tobacco smoking remains the most important avoidable cancer risk in the world.

Related content

New cases of lung cancer per 100 000 men vs. per 100 000 women in Gapminder World.

Prostate Cancer Statistics

About this Video

In this video, Hans Rosling briefly reviews the risk of getting diagnosed with, and the risk of dying from, prostate cancer in the world.

The data is compiled by IARC ( International Agency for research on Cancer) in Lyon, France. The most striking is the high rate of diagnosis per 100 000 men in USA and some countries in West Europe. In contrast, Japan has a very low rate and the most probable explanation is a genetic predisposition in men of European origin. The data is displayed in bubbles for each country and the color of the bubbles refers to the continent where each country is situated.

Related content

New cases of prostate cancer per 100 000 men (+ size showing number of new cases)

Breast Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Breast Cancer is the most common form of cancer among women. Unlike cervical cancer, breast cancer is more common in rich countries than in low- and middle-income countries and also tends to increase as a country gets richer.

But with higher income there are also better chances to save women who get cancer. The data from IARC, now presented in Gapminder World shows how breast cancer has increased in countries like Sweden, but also how death rates are falling. Today, most of the women who get breast cancer in Sweden will survive.

The challenge is to make sure that also low- and middle-income countries will be able to afford treatment for its women when the number of breast cancer now will increase, as they continue to develop.

Related content

See Breast Cancer graphs in Gapminder World.
– – – – – – – – – – – – –
Data source: The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

Liver Cancer Statistics

About this Video

In this video, Hans Rosling uses liver cancer statistics to show how cancer data from IARC ( International Agency for research on Cancer) can be displayed as moving bubbles in Gapminder World. In this visual way, you can easily compare data for the most common cancers and rapidly understand that each of them have different distributions in the world. Liver cancer is mainly caused by chronic infection by the Hepatitis B virus (and also by the Hepatitis C virus). As this infection is most common in China and other parts of East Asia, as well as in Africa South of the Sahara, it is the countries in these regions that bear the main burden of Liver Cancer in the World (independent of if they have low, middle or high income). Comparing gender differences indicate that higher alcohol consumption in men may explain why the rate of liver cancer in men is twice as high as in women.

Related content

New cases of liver cancer per 100 000 men (with size showing the total number of new cases of liver cancer)

Colon Cancer Statistics

About this Video

In this video, Hans Rosling shows that cancer in the large intestine, i.e. colon, gets more common when countries get richer. The data is compiled by IARC ( International Agency for research on Cancer) in Lyon, France. It reveals that colon cancer is equally common in men and women, that eat similar diets, in high-income countries. Prevention through promotion of health diet have not yet had any big effect but advanced screening programs and improved treatment have decreased the death rate among colon cancer patients in high-income countries. It is paradoxical that high-income leads to a diet that cause this cancer while at the same time only high-income can support a health service that can cure it.
Effective prevention could avoid a lot of suffering and save money for health services.

Related content

New cases of colon cancer per 100 000 men (with size showing size of population)

Stomach Cancer Statistics

About this Video

In this video, Hans Rosling shows that stomach cancer is rare in the poorest countries and the rate of this cancer reach a peak in middle income countries. When countries get still richer the frequency falls. This is in sharp contrast to breast and colon cancer that tend to increase in frequency as countries get richer and richer. The rate of stomach cancer has been especially high in Japan and China. In Japan, wide-spread screening programs using the Japanese endoscopy invention have contributed to reduced death rate in this cancer.
Having seen the video you can look yourself in Gapminder World where the cancer data from IARC (International Agency for research on Cancer) is displayed as moving bubbles.

Related content

New cases of stomach cancer per 100 000 men (with size showing the total number of new cases of stomach cancer)

Cervical Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Cervical cancer is common among middle-aged women.  It is caused by a sexually transmitted papillomavirus that causes a lesion in the lower part of the uterus that, in some women, can develop into cancer.

By introducing screening test, so called ”pap smear test”, many countries have managed to reduce the number of women affected by cervical cancer dramatically, and by doing so saving thousands of women every year.

Unlike some other cancers (e.g. breast cancer) cervical cancer is decreasing with higher income.

In this video Hans Rosling compare two nordic countries, Denmark and Norway that, at different times, introduced the Pap smear screening and the effect it has had on the number of women who got cancer.

Related content

See Cervical Cancer graphs in Gapminder World:
Denmark and Norway
Cervical cancer and income in the whole world.

Shanghai, New York, Mumbai

About this Video

See the development of three centers of trade, Shanghai, New York and Mumbai.
Also, a comparison of the capitals: Beijing, Washington, D.C. and New Delhi.
And finally, a note from Professor Rosling on how one can measure the progress of President Obama’s intentions to improve the health system of the US.

Related content

Gaps within China, India, US

Yes they can!

About this Video

Yes they can! says Hans Rosling about low and middle income countries that, with economic and health progress, are catching up with high income countries – countries we used to call the western world.
Hint: Press the icon in the right bottom corner of the video window to see the video in fullscreen.

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Gapminder HIV Chart

About this Chart

Gapminder HIV Chart 2009 is a map for print. It may be redistributed under a CreativeCommons license.
The size of the country bubbles in the chart represents the Number of people living with HIV. The y-axis and x-axis shows Adult HIV prevalence rate and Income per person, respectively.
Read more about HIV Trends in the blog: “See new surprising trends in HIV”

MDG 4 – Reducing Child Mortality

MDG4

See the presentation on-line or choose download option below.

About this Flash presentation

This is the clickable presentation used in Gapminder Video #11.
You can use this presentation when you lecture, showing it from start to finish or selecting from the different chapters.

Produced in collaboration with NORAD (Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation).

Download

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Debunking myths about the “third world”

About this talk

You’ve never seen data presented like this. Hans Rosling’s presentation at the TED-conference in 2006 has been seen by millions over the internet, at TED’s web-page, at Google Video or Youtube.

With the urgency of a sportscaster,  Hans Rosling debunks myths about the so-called “developing world” using the animation software that powers Gapminder World.

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Flash-presentation used.

The seemingly impossible is possible

About this talk

This year, 2007, Hans Rosling’s TED-speech focused on making the seemingly impossible possible.

The Trendalyzer software (recently acquired by Google) turns complex global trends into lively animations, making decades of data pop. Asian countries, as colorful bubbles, float across the grid – toward better national health and wealth.

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Go to the speach from 2006.

Human Development Trends, 2005

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About this Flash presentation

A presentation for UNDP Human Development Report 2005 in English and some other languages. Human Development Trends was produced in 2005.

Available in:

English, Danish, Finnish, French, German, Hungarian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish.

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(open .zip-file and run “application.swf” in your Flash Player)

Source

The data used in the presentation above is based on estimates from the following background paper for the Human Development Report 2005:​

Dikhanov, Yuri (2005). Trends in global income distribution, 1970-2000, and scenarios for 2015. Human Development Report Office Occasional paper.

Reducing Child Mortality

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWI_1QoQ9aM

About

Nearly 10 million children under five die every year. Almost 90% of all child deaths are attributable to just six conditions: neonatal causes, pneumonia, diarrhoea, malaria, measles, and HIV/AIDS.

The aim (Millenium Development Goal 4) is to cut child mortality by two thirds by 2015.
How can this be achieved?
Which countries make sufficient progress?
And by which rate did a country like Norway reduce its child mortality the last 100 years?

Watch Gapminder Video #11 to understand the background and the current status of a Millenium Development Goal.

Related content

Clickable presentation

Chimpanzees know better?

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uabWkN2THc8&start=210

About this Video

Hans Rosling, Professor of International Health at Karolinska Institutet, uses Gapminder World to shed light on perceived and real differences in the way we live around the world. He is introduced by the session moderator Chrystia Freeland, the US Managing Editor of the FT.

A Slum Insight

[flv://static.gapminder.org/GapminderMedia/GapTools/Awalkintheslum2006/slum_insight.flv 620 430]

About this Video

A slum insight is a video developed by Gapminder in collaboration with UN-Habitat and ITC for the UN Habitat conference World Urban Forum III , Vancouver, Canada. The film was directed by Filmfront Stockholm and the graphic profile was made by Zut.

Click here to download the video (mp4)

<br /> A Slum Insight is free to use and distribute under a Creative Common licence, as long as you credit Gapminder.

Carbon dioxide (Energy)

httpvh://youtube.com/watch?v=4IkHtTgn3Nk

About

All humans emit carbon dioxide (CO2) and contribute to the climate crisis. But some humans emits much more than others.

Although the total CO2 emissions from China are almost as big as those from United States, the emissions from a single American are more than 6 times larger than those from a person in China.

In China today, almost 80% of the electricity is produced from coal, and that proportion is increasing. What China needs is an environmental-friendly way of producing electricity that is cheaper than coal.

Data used

CO2 emissions
in Gapminder World

Public services

httpvh://youtube.com/watch?v=6cl1hp0b6Aw

About

To have a fair chance in life, everyone needs public services, practical things like safe drinking water, schools and health services.

It’s also very important that information about these services is readily available in a useful form. We need good information in order to provide good public service.

Statistics are needed on the access and quality of those services. Both for those who provide it and those who have the right to demand access to it.

Data used

Births attended by skilled health staff in Gapminder World

Turkey meets France

httpvh://youtube.com/watch?v=j4GztlkyedQ

About this Gapminder Video

There are many differences between Turkey and France. But are the differences increasing or decreasing? From a public health perspective, the answer is obvious, Turkey is catching up.

Even if the population growth is still faster in Turkey than in France, the number of children per women today is almost the same, which means that the polulation growth in Turkey will slow down.

Maternal mortality

httpvh://youtube.com/watch?v=LilKcFUhuNw

About this Gapminder Video

How many women die every year during pregnancy and childbirth? Do we even know?

The most qualified guess tells us that about 500 000 women die every year because of pregnancy. However, the numbers are so uncertain, that we can’t even tell if the situation improves from one year to another.

So, if the uncertainty about the maternal mortality is so high, is there any point of measuring maternal mortality at all? And how can we tell if things are improving?

The answers are: Yes it is. And there are better ways of monitoring progress for pregnant women in the world.

While maternal mortality cannot be used to measure progress year by year towards safe motherhood, at least not in low income countries, we need to know the magnitude of the problem. Therefore we need to know roughly how many women dies every year while giving birth.

But in order to solve the problem, and to see if we are improving from one year to another, we should look at other indicators such as how many births that are attended by skilled health staff.

Chile, a developing country?

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDK1OaFvtls

About this Gapminder Video

What’s the difference between Chile, Cuba and the USA?
Well, it depends on what kind of factors you are looking at. What is obvious however, is that an explanation of reality demands far more complex groupings of countries then in “developed” and “developing countries”.

In some aspects Cuba was closer to USA than to Chile in 1962. Today all three countries has a low child mortality but differs both in fertility rate and in income.

Bangladesh Miracle

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAJC2YAJw_A

About this Gapminder video

Have you heard about the miracle that has happened in Bangladesh over the last 30 years? No?

Bangladesh has the highest population density among the world’s most populous countries. Today, Bangladesh has more people than Russia, but the area is smaller than Florida.

So what is the Miracle? In 1970 an average women in Bangladesh gave birth to 7 children, and one of four of them died before the age of five. But after independence from Pakistan in 1971 things has improved. See Hans Rosling’s Gapminder video to understand how much.

Globalization

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAP09ITNWN4

About this Gapminder video

To live in “extreme poverty” – with less than 1 dollar a day – means you wake up hungry, you go to bed hungry and you have to use all your resources just to acquire food.

How has the Global Economy effected the income of people across the world?

Although the percentage of poverty has gone down, the number of poor people is still very high. Still, the percentage of people living in extreme poverty has gone down from around 40 percent 30 years ago to today’s number of around 20 percent.

The good news is that the eradication of poverty is within human range.

Health, Money & Sex in Sweden

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18MZmVDv7uo

About this Gapminder video

In the first Gapminder video from Gapminder, Professor Hans Rosling shows how economic growth, public health and sexual rights have changed in Sweden during 300 years.

In only 6 minutes he shows life expectancy and GDP per capita of Sweden from 1709 to 2004. With trendalyzer graphics he compares historic Sweden with countries of today. 300 years of Swedish progress covers today’s disparity from Sierra Leone to Japan. Wheras education of midwives started in 1709 it was only in the 1970’es that family planning was included in their training. Sexual rights came late in Sweden compared to progress in health and wealth.

History of Karolinska Institutet

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About this Flash presentation

A presentation about the history of Karolinska Institutet. Gapminder made a presentation to Hans Rosling for a presentation about the change of Head of Karolinska Institutet (in 2004 Hans Wigzell handed over to Harriet Wallberg-Henriksson).

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Has the World Become a Better Place?

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About this Flash presentation

A presentation showing fertility rate and child mortality of all countries 1962-2003. Developed in collaboration with Aktuellt at the Swedish Public Service broadcaster – Sveriges Television (SVT) . Produced 2005.

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Tällberg Presentation, 2004

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About this Flash presentation

A presentation comparing Sweden’s historic development in heath and income (1743 – 2004) in comparison with countries in 2004.

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Income Distribution, 2003

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About this Flash presentation

Compare income distribution within or between countries. Based on data from Professor Xavier Sala-i-Martin.

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